Archive for March, 2009

Taxes By Goverment

March 31, 2009
“Let the king in conjunction with the Assembly, after full consideration, so levy taxes in his dominions as to ensure the happiness of both the rulers and the ruled. Let the king draw an annual revenue from his people little by little just as the leech, the suckling calf and the bee take their food** little by little. Let him not, through extreme covetousness, destroy the very roots of his own and others, happiness, since

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*Till they are able to earn their own living.
** i.e., the blood, the milk and the honey respectively. -Tr.

he, who cuts off the roots of happiness and temporal prosperity, brings nothing but misery on himself as well as on others.

The king who can be both gently and stern as occasion demands is highly honored if he be gentle to the good and stern towards the wicked.

Having thus arranged the affairs of the State, let him devote himself to the protection and welfare of his people with diligent attention. Know that king as well as his ministers to be dead, not alive, the lives and property of those subjects are violently taken away by ruffians whilst they lament and cry aloud for help. Great shall be his suffering. Promotion of happiness of their subjects, therefore, is the highest duty of kings. The king who discharges this duty faithfully, levies taxes and governs the country with the help of the Assembly* enjoys happiness, but he who does otherwise is afflicted with misery and suffering.” MANU 7: 128, 129,139, 140,141-144.

“Let the king rise in the last watch of the night, have a wash, meditate on God with his whole attention, perform Homa, pay his respects to the devoutly learned men, take his meal and enter the audience chamber. Let him standing there show respect to the people present. Having dismissed them, let him take counsel with his Prime Minister on state affairs. Thereafter let him go out for a walk or a ride, seek the top of a mountain wilderness, where there is not even the tiniest tree (to hide a person), or a sequestered house and discuss (state affairs) with him in all sincerity.

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* As described in Manu in the 7th Chapter. -Tr.

“That king, whose profound thoughts other men even though combined cannot unravel, in other words, whose thought are deep, pure, centered on public good, and hidden shall rule the whole earth, even though they be poor. Let him never do even a single thing without the approval of the Assembly.” MANU 7: 145 – 148.

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Taxes By Goverment

March 31, 2009

“Let the king in conjunction with the Assembly, after full consideration, so levy taxes in his dominions as to ensure the happiness of both the rulers and the ruled. Let the king draw an annual revenue from his people little by little just as the leech, the suckling calf and the bee take their food** little by little. Let him not, through extreme covetousness, destroy the very roots of his own and others, happiness, since

——————————————————————————–
*Till they are able to earn their own living.
** i.e., the blood, the milk and the honey respectively. -Tr.

he, who cuts off the roots of happiness and temporal prosperity, brings nothing but misery on himself as well as on others.

The king who can be both gently and stern as occasion demands is highly honored if he be gentle to the good and stern towards the wicked.

Having thus arranged the affairs of the State, let him devote himself to the protection and welfare of his people with diligent attention. Know that king as well as his ministers to be dead, not alive, the lives and property of those subjects are violently taken away by ruffians whilst they lament and cry aloud for help. Great shall be his suffering. Promotion of happiness of their subjects, therefore, is the highest duty of kings. The king who discharges this duty faithfully, levies taxes and governs the country with the help of the Assembly* enjoys happiness, but he who does otherwise is afflicted with misery and suffering.” MANU 7: 128, 129,139, 140,141-144.

“Let the king rise in the last watch of the night, have a wash, meditate on God with his whole attention, perform Homa, pay his respects to the devoutly learned men, take his meal and enter the audience chamber. Let him standing there show respect to the people present. Having dismissed them, let him take counsel with his Prime Minister on state affairs. Thereafter let him go out for a walk or a ride, seek the top of a mountain wilderness, where there is not even the tiniest tree (to hide a person), or a sequestered house and discuss (state affairs) with him in all sincerity.

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* As described in Manu in the 7th Chapter. -Tr.

“That king, whose profound thoughts other men even though combined cannot unravel, in other words, whose thought are deep, pure, centered on public good, and hidden shall rule the whole earth, even though they be poor. Let him never do even a single thing without the approval of the Assembly.” MANU 7: 145 – 148.

REVENUE BY GOVERMENT

March 31, 2009

“Let the king collect his revenue through honorable, trustworthy and accomplished men possessed of excellent character. Let him, who is the President of the Assembly, his ministers and other officials, and the Assembly observe the eternal principles taught by the Vedas, and let them act like fathers to the people.
Let the Assembly appoint officials of various kinds whose sole duty it should be to see that the State officials in all departments

of their duties faithfully according to the regulations. Leth them, who discharge their duties satisfactorily, be honored, whilst those who do not, be punished properly.

In order to disseminate the knowledge of the Veda which is truly called the imperishable treasure of the kings, let the king and the Assembly show due respect to students, who return from their seminaries after having studied the Vedaas and Shaatraas in the Order of Brahmacharya as well as their teachers. This helps forward the spread of education and the progress of a country.

If a king, devoted to the warfare of his people, be defied by an enemy of equal, greater, or lessstrength, let him remember the duty of Kshatriya and never shrink from going to battle. Let him fight with such skill as may ensure his victory.

Those kings who, with the object of defeating their enemies, fight fearlessly to their utmost and never turn away from the field of battle shall obtain happiness. They must never turn their backs upon the field of battle, but it is sometime necessary to hide away from the enemy in order to obtain victory over him. Let them employ all kinds of tactics to ensure their success in battle, but let them not perish foolishly like a tiger who, when his temper is rouse, exposes himself foolishly to the fire and is thereby killed.

In the field of battle let soldiers bear in mind the duty of men of honor, and, therefore, never strike a man who is standing near a field of battle – a non-combatant – nor one who is a eunuch, nor one who with folded palms begs for peace, nor one whose hair is dishevelled or scattered (over his eyes), nor one who is sitting at ease, nor one who says ‘I am at your mercy’, nor one who is asleep, nor one who is unconscious or in a fit, nor one who is disarmed, nor one who is naked, nor one who is a mere spectator, nor one who is only a camp-follower, nor one who is in agony of pain

from his wounds, nor one who is an invalid, nor one who is seriously wounded, nor one who is terrified, nor one who is running away (from the field of battle).

They should make them prisoners and provide them with food, drink and other necessaries of life. The wounded should be medically attended to. They should never be teased or made to suffer in any way. They should be employed in the kind of work that suits their station, etc. the king should especially see that no one strikes a woman, a child, and old man, a wounded man and one who is diseased or afflicted with sorrow.

Let him protect and bring up their children as if they were his own daughters or sisters. Nor should he ever look upon them with the eye of lust. After the country has settled down, let him send all those, from whom he does not fear a fresh revolt, away to their own homes; but let him keep in prison all others who, he fears, may possibly raise the standard of revolt.

The soldier, who cowardly turns his back on a field of battle and is slain (by an enemy), is thus rightly punished for his disloyalty to his master who shall take unto himself all the honor due to the deceased on account of his past good conduct which begets happiness in this world and in the next. The soldier, who is killed whilst running away from the field of battle, shall never obtain happiness. All his good work is nullified by this act of cowardice. He alone wins laurels who fights faithfully.

Let the king never violate this law that carriages, horses, elephants, tents, umbrellas, grain, silver and gold, cattle such as cows, women, cases of oil and butter, and various other articles are lawful

Prize of the soldier or of the officer who takes them in war. The captors should give the sixteenth part of their loot to the king, and so should the latter distribute among the whole army the sixteenth part of what was taken by them collectively.” MANU 7: 80-82, 87, 89, 91-99.

Let the wife and children have the share of the man who is killed in war. The wife and children of that man should be well look after till the children are grown up when the king should offer them suitable state appointments.

Let no one, who is desirous of augmenting the prosperity of his State and of gaining fame, victory, and happiness, transgress this law.

“What the king and the Assembly have not let them strive hard to get, what they preserved let them augment, and let them spend the augmented wealth in the diffusion of the knowledge of the Vedaas, the spread of the principles of true religion, in helping scholars and preachers of the Vedic religion, and bringing up orphans. Having learnt the fourfold object of activity let him shun sloth and live an active life.

Let him obtain what he has not got b the observance of the law, and what he has acquired let him protect with diligent attention, what he has protected let him augment by investing profitably, and let him always spend his augmented wealth in the furtherance of the aforesaid cause.

Let him on all occasions act without guile and never without sincerity, but, keeping himself well on his guard let him discover and ward off the evil designs of his enemy.

Let him ponder over the acquisition of wealth like a heron that pretends to be as if in meditative attitude just before catching fish. Having obtained the necessary material and augmented his power, let him put forth his strength like a lion to vanquish his foe; like a tiger let him stealthily creep towards his enemy and catch him. When a powerful enemy has come close by, let him run away form him like a hare and then over take him by strategem.

Let not his foe discover his weak points but the vulnerable points of his foe let him himself well discern. Let him hide his vulnerable points form his enemy just as a tortoise draws in his limbs and keeps them concealed from view.

Let such a victorious sovereign reduce all dacoits, robbers and the like to submission by conciliating them, by giving them presents or by turning them against each other. If he fails to restrain then by those means let him do so by infliction heavy punishment on them.

As a farmer separates the husk from the corn without injuring the latter, so should a king exterminate dacoits and burglars, and thus protect his people.

The king, who, through neglect of duty and lack of understanding oppresses his people, soon loses his kingdom and perishes with his family before his time. MANU 7: 99, 101, 104-107, 110-117, 120-124

Just as living beings lose their lives through the failure of their bodily strength, so do kings as well as their families lose their power, and even their lives by oppressing their subjects.

Therefore, in order to conduct the government properly let the king and the assembly so strive as to fully accomplish this object. The king who is always devoted to the welfare of his people obtains perpetual happiness.

Let him, therefore, have an administrative office in the midst of two, three, five and a hundred villages, wherein he should keep the required number of officials to carry on government business. Let him appoint an official at the head of one village, a second one over ten such villages, a third one over twenty, a fourth one over one hundred villages, and a fifth one over a thousand such villages.*

Let the Lord (i.e., the administrator) of one town daily apprise the Lord of Ten Towns privately of all crimes committed within his jurisdiction and the Lord of Ten submit his report to the Lord of Twenty. Let the Lord of Twenty notify all such matters to the Lord of one hundredevery day and the Lord of one Hundred, to the Lord of one Thousand, in other words, five Lords of Twenty, to a Lord of one Hundred, ten Lords of a Hundred, to a Lord of Ten thousand, and the Lord of Ten Thousand to an assembly which governs the affairs of a hundred thousand townships and all such Assemblies, to the Supreme International Assembly representing the whole world.

Over every ten thousand villages let him appoint two presiding officials, one of whom should preside over the Assembly, whilst the

* In other words, the present system of having a Surveyor (Patwari) in one village, a branch Police Station for every ten villages and Head Police Station over two branch stations, a Tahsil over the five such Police Stations, a district over ten such Tahsils, and so on, has been borrowed from our ancient system of Government as taught by Manu.

othershould tour all over the country and diligently inspect the work and conduct of all the magistrates and other officials.

For the purpose of holding the meetings of town councils let him erect a Town Hall in every big town. It should be lofty, capacious, and beautiful like the moon, wherein let the members of the town council, who should be men of vast learning and experience, deliberate over the affairs of their town, and make such laws as will promote the welfare of the people and advance the cause of education and enlighenment.

Let the inspecting governor have detectives under him – who should come from Kshatriya (protectors) as well as other Classes – and through them let him secretly know perfectly the conduct – good or bad – of the Government servants as well as that of the people. Let him punish those who do not faithfully discharge their duties and honor those who conduct is praiseworthy.

Let the king appoint such men guardians of his people as are virtuous, well-experienced, learned and of good lineage; under such learned officials let him also place men who are very wicked* as burglars and robbers, i.e., who live by seizing what belongs to others. It will help to keep those men form the pursuit of their wicked ways, as well as, to protect the people properly.

Let the king punish properly the magistrate who accepts bribe ether from the plaintiff or the defendant in a case and, therefore,

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* On the principle that the best keeper is an old poacher. -Tr.

gives an just decision, confiscate all his possessions, and banish him to a place form which he can never return. Were that man to go unpunished, it would encourage other officials to commit similar wicked crimes, whilst the infliction of punishment would serve to check them. But let those officials be paid handsomely for their services – either by gifts of land or in lump sums of money, paid annually or monthly – enough to keep them in comfort and even to make them rich.

Let an old official in consideration of his services be granted a pension equal to half his pay. This pension must last only so long as he lives, not after. But let his children be properly honored or given Government appointments according to their qualifications. Let his wife and children* be given an allowance by the State enough for their subsistence which should be stopped if they turn wicked. Let the king constantly follow this policy.”

THE QUALIFICATIONS OF MINISTERS AND MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLIES

March 31, 2009

“Let a king appoint seven or eight good, righteous and clever ministers who are natives of the country, are thoroughly conversant with the Vedaas and the Shaatraas, are very brave and courageous, whose judgement seldom errs, who come from a good family and are well-tried men.
Even an act easy in itself becomes difficult to be accomplished by a man when single-handed. How much more so then, is the great work of the government of a country by a man single-handed. It is, therefore, a most dangerous thing to make one man a despotic ruler, or entrust a single man with sole management of the affairs of the State.

Let the Head of State, then, constantly consult with his clever with his clever and earned ministers on the affairs of the State, such as:- 1. Peace. 2. War 3. Defense – quietly protecting his own country against a foreign attack and waiting for an opportunity. 4. Offence – attacking an enemy when he finds himself strong enough to do. 5. Proper management of the internal affairs of the State, the exchequer and the Army. 6. Pacification of the newly

conquered countries by freeing them from all kinds of disturbance. Let him daily reflect on the six subjects.

Having ascertained the individual opinion of each of his ministers and other members of the Assembly, let him abide by the decision of the majority and do what is beneficial for him as well for others.

Let him likewise appoint other ministers who are men of great integrity, highly intellectual, of resolute minds, of great organizing power and of vast experience.

Let him appoint good, energetic, strong, and clever officers, as many as he requires, for the due transaction of the business of the State. Under them let brave, courageous strong men of great integrity and of noble lineage fill position involving great responsibility and risk, whilst let timid and faint-hearted men be employed for the administration of internal affairs.

Let him also appoint an Ambassador who comes from a good family, is very clever, perfectly honest, able to read the inmost thoughts of others and to foretell future, developments and events by observing the expression of faces and other significant signs and acts, and is well-versed in all the Shaastraas – branches of knowledge.

He alone is fit person to be appointed an Ambassador who is very much devoted to politics, loves his country with all his heart, is of irreproachable character, pure in heart, highly intelligent and endowed with an excellent memory, who can adapt himself to the manners and customs of different countries and different times, is good looking, fearless and a master of elocution.” MANU 7: 54-57, 60-62, 64.

DUTIES OF MINISTERS AND OTHER HIGH OFFICIALS

March 31, 2009

The power to enforce the law should be vested in a minister who should see that the law is administered justly, treasury and other affairs of the State should be under the control of the king, peace and war under that of the Ambassador, and everything under the control of the

Assembly. It is the Ambassador alone who can make peace between enemies, or war between friends. He should so strive as to divide enemies united against his country.

Thus having learnt the designs of his enemy let a king – the President of the Assembly (as well as members of the Assembly, Ambassadors and others) – endeavour to guard himself against al danger from him.

In a thickly wooded country, where the soil is rich, let him build himself a town surrounded by a fortress of earth, or one protected by water, or one surrounded by a thick wood on all sides, or a fortress of armed men, or one surrounded by a mountain.

Let him build a wall round the city, because one brave, well-armed soldier placed inside it is a match for a hundred, and a hundred for thousands. It is therefore, extremely necessary to build a fort. Let the for t be well-supplied with arms and ammunition, with various kinds of grain and other food stuffs, with conveyances and beasts of burden, etc., with teachers and preachers, artisans, various kinds of machines, with grass and grain, etc., for animals, and with water, etc. In the centre of the town let him build for himself a Government house, well- protected from wind, etc., suited to all weathers, with

well provided parks and gardens round it, and well-supplied with water. It should be big for all the state functions.

Having done so far, that is, having completed his studies in the order of Brahmacharya and settled the affairs of the State, let him choose a consort of Kshatriya Class, born of a high family, endowed with beauty and other excellent qualities, dearest to his heart, blessed with charming manners, etc., and equal to him in knowledge, acquisitions, accomplishments and of like temperament. Let him take one wife and one only, and consider all other women as unapproachable, therefore let him not even look at another woman (with the eye of lust).

Let him retain a chaplain and a spiritual teacher to perform Homa and Yajnas suitable for different season sand other religious duties for him in the palace, and let him always devote himself to the business of the State. To devote himself day and night to the affairs of the State without allowing anything to go out of order is the highest duty of a king, aye, this is his worship, this is his communion.” MANU 7: 65, 66,68, 70, 74-78.

QUALIFICATIONS OF THE HEAD OF THE STATE

March 31, 2009

“He should be as powerful as electricity: as dear to his people’s hearts as their very breath, able to read the inmost thoughts of others, and just in his dealings as a Judge. He should enlighten people’s mind by the spread of knowledge, justice, and righteousness, and dispel ignorance and injustice as the sun illuminates the world. He should be like one who consumes wickedness like fire, keeps the wicked and the criminal under control like a jailer, gladdens the hearts of the good like the moon; makes the country rich and prosperous, as a treasurer keeps his treasury full; is powerful and majestic like the sun, keeps the people in order and awe; and on whom no one in the whole world dares to look with a stern eye. He alone is then fit to be the Head of the State who is like fire, air, the sun, the moon, a judge, a treasurer, a goaler in keeping the wicked under control, and like electricity in power.” MANU 7: 4, 6, 7.

THE TRUE KING

“The Law alone is the real king, the dispenser of justice, the disciplinarian. The Law is considered as the surety for the four Classes and Orders to discharge properly their respective duties. The Law alone is the true Governor that maintains order among the people. The Law alone

is their Protector. The Law keeps awake whilst all the people are fast asleep. The wise, therefore, look upon the Law alone as Dharma or Right. When rightly administered the Law makes all men happy but when administered wrongly, i.e., without due regard to the requirement of justice, it ruins the king. All the four Classes would become corrupt, all order would come to an end, there would be nothing but chaos and corruption if the Law were not properly enforced. Where the Law – which is likened unto a fear-inspiring man, black in colour and with red eyes – striking fear into the hearts of the people (evil) and preventing them form committing crimes, rules supreme, there the people never go astray, and consequently live in happiness if it be administered by a just and learned man.

He alone is considered a fit person to administer the Law by the wise, who invariably speaks the truth, is thoughtful, highly intellectual and very clever in the attainment of virtue, wealth and righteous desires. The Law rightly administered by the king greatly promotes the practice of virtue, acquisition of wealth and secures the attainment of the heart-felt desires of his people. But the same Law destroys the king who is sensual, indolent, crafty, malevolent, mean and low-minded.

Great is the power and majesty of the Law. It cannot be administered by a man who is ignorant and unjust. It surely brings the downfall of the king who deviates from the path of rectitude.

The Law can never be justly administered by a man who is destitute of learning and culture, has no wise and good men to assist him, and is sunk in sensualism. He alone is fit administer the Law- which is another name for justice – who is wise, pure in heart, of truthful character, associates with the good, conducts himself according to the law and is assisted by the truly good and great men in the discharge of his duties.” MANU 7: 17, 19,24, 28, 30, 31.

CHIEF OFFICES

“The four chief Offices – Commander-in -Chief of the forces, Head of the Civil Government, Minister of Justice, and the Supreme Head of all – the King – should be held only by those persons who are well -versed in all the four Vedas and the Shaastraas, are conversant with all the sciences and philosophies, devout, and have perfect control over their desires, passions and possess a noble character.
Let no man transgress that law which has been passed by an Assembly of ten men learned and wise, or at the very least of three such men. This Assembly must consist of members who are well-versed in the four Vedas, keen logicians, masters of language, and men conversant with the science of religion, they must belong to the first three Orders – Brahmacharya, (celibacy), Grihastha (married life), Vaanaprastha (renunciation)

Let no man transgress what has been decided by even an Assembly of three men who are scholars of the Rig Veda, the Yajur Veda and Saama Veda respectively.

Even the decision of one Sanyaasi, (wise) who is fully conversant with all four Vedaas and is superior to all the twice-born (Dwijaas) should be considered of the highest authority. But let no man abide by the decision of myriads of ignorant men.

Even a meeting of thousands of men cannot be designated an Assembly, if they be destitute of such high virtues as self-control or truthful character, be ignorant of the Vedas and be men of no understanding like the Shoodraas.

Let no man abide by the law laid down by men who are altogether ignorant, and destitute of the knowledge of the Veda, or whosoever obeys the law propounded by ignorant fools falls into hundreds of kinds of sin and vice. Therefore, let not ignorant fools be ever made members of the aforesaid three Assemblies – Political, Educational and Religious. On the other hand let learned and devout persons only be elected to such high offices. MANU 12: 100, 110-111.

Parents and conception

March 30, 2009

Maatrimaan Pitrimaan A’charyavaan Purusho Veda – Shatapatha Brahmana.
“Verily, that man alone can become a great scholar who has had the advantage of three good teachers, viz., father, mother, and preceptor.” Blessed is the family, most fortunate is the child whose parents are godly and learned. The mother’s healthy influence on her children surpasses that of everyone else. No other person can equal a mother inn her love for her children, or in her anxiety for their welfare.
this explains the use of the word Matrimaan in the above quotation, meaning thereby:-“He alone is said to have a mother whose mother is devout and learned.” Blessed is the mother who never ceases to impart to religious tone to the mind of her child from the time of conception till his knowledge is perfected.
It behoves both parents before, during, and after conception to avoid the use of such foods and drinks as are intoxicating, decomposed (Lit. – foul-smelling) non-nutritious, (Lit. dry), and prejudicial to the growth of the intellect; and use those articles that are productive of mental tranquility, health, strength, intellect, energy and good temper – qualities that go to make a man refined.
Such foods are milk, butter, sugar, cereals etc., – foods and drinks that help to make the reproductive element (both male and female) of the highest quality, free from all faults and imperfections. They should follow the rules of sexual intercourse, which are as follows:-From the time of menstruation the 16th day following is the proper time for (sexual intercourse) barring the first four days and Maatrimaan Pitrimaan A’charyavaan Purusho Veda – Shatapatha Brahmana. In the text the word mata, i.e., mother precedes the word pita, i.e., father. In the Sanskrit language and all vernaculars derived from it, it is a invariable practice to use the word mata before the word pita whenever they happen to come together.
Not only this but the word “wife” comes before the word “husband” and the name of the wife before that of the wife before that of the husband. We speak of Sitaram and not Ramsita. This shows in, what veneration the female sex was held by the ancients. -Rama Deva.
the 11th and 13th of the (lunar) month; so that there are altogther left ten nights out of which it is best to choose one for sexual intercourse.
After the 16th day there should be no sexual intercourse till the return of the aforesaid period, or, in case of pregnancy for one year. At the time of sexual intercourse husband and wife should be perfectly healthy, mutually happy, and free from sorrow. In the matter of diet and dress they should follow the rules laid down by Charak and Sushrut, and in the matter of keeping each other happy they ought to practice the system taught by Manu.
During conception the mother ought to be very careful as to her diet and dress. Till the birth of the child those articles only should be used as are productive of intellect, strength, beauty, health, energy and mental tranquility, and such other good qualities.
After the child is born and its cord had been tied, it ought to be bathed with scented water and Homa performed with scented clarified butter. The mother should also be well looked after in the matter of bath, diet, etc., so that both mother and child may gradually gain in health and strength. The child’s mother or wet-nurse should take such foods and drinks as are productive of good qualities in the milk.
The mother should suckle the child only for the first six days, thereafter the wet-nurse; but the parents should see that the wet-nurse gets good food and drink.
The mother should suckle the child only for the first six days, thereafter the wet-nurse; but the par4ents should see that the wet-nurse gets good food and drink. If the parents be too poor to afford a wet-nurse, cow’s or goat’s milk diluted with an equal quantity of water should be used; and such drugs as are productive of intellect, energy, and health should be added to the milk after being well soaked in pure water boiled, and strained.
After confinement the mother and the child should be removed to another room, where the air is pure, and which is well furnished with scented and beautiful things. They should move about in a pure atmosphere. When neither the wet-nurses nor milk (cow’s or goat’s) can e procured, the parents should do what they think best at the time; but they must remember the child’s body is made up of the elements derived from the body of the mother, which fact accounts for the mother getting weaker after each confinement. It is best, therefore, for the mother not
*Two great authorities on Medical Science in Sanskrt

ARYS SAMAJ MANDIR MAVDI

March 29, 2009

arya samaj rajkot

Sri Acharya Pemdev Sashtri
A young scholar and thinker of Aryasamaj is doing extra-ordinary scientific study of Yog Darshan and Vedic books.
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There are parts of discource where we celebrate together, where we work and break new grounds. Release your divine and healthy side with love and divinity. You shall experience yourself in the mystical state of union.

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Discover how the knowledge of past lives can open a new vision of what you really desire in life.

We all are carrying our past either from this life time or previous one. Our unconscious mind stores each and every happening around us, at every moment and we are unaware of it. With time they become memories and these memories leave strong impression on our mind which we carry forward, sometimes they are so strong that it affects an individuals whole life. But once you re-experience the memories from the past, they get dissolved.
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ARYA SAMAJ

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MAVDI GAM,DIS- RAJKOT 360004 GUJARAT(INDIA) , Mobile no. 09824280834.

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March 29, 2009

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Acharya Dr.Premdev Shastri Jee

March 24, 2009






vedik vangmay discorses at university rajkot


By Acharya Dr.Premdev Shastri Jee